North Atlantic right whale: historical summer records

Review of the historical records (pre-1950) of the North Atlantic Right Whale, Eubalaena glacialis, during the summer months (June to September).

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Historical records (pre 1950)

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ID17: 11/08/1760; Grand Banks of Newfoundland: 42.782700, -49.120900
ID16: Summer 1583 ; Placentia Bay, Grand Bay: 47.038800, -54.513700
ID1: 06/1699; Long Island, NY: 40.572600, -73.817100
ID2: 08/1733; Bay of Fundy: 44.697700, -66.331200
ID3: ca. 1/09/1838; Massachusetts Bay: 42.803200, -70.704500
ID4: 31/07/1839; Long Island, NY: 40.864700, -72.379900
ID5: 1/06/1841; Long Island, NY: 41.088900, -72.211800
ID6: 28/07/1841; Long Island, NY: 40.946800, -72.146600
ID7: ca. 1/06/1860; Block Island, NY: 41.161600, -71.530300
ID8: 18/06/1866; Long Island, NY: 41.091600, -72.189500
ID9: 06/1872; Long Island, NY: 40.951300, -72.127900
ID10: ca. 1/06/1888; Cape Cod: 42.151400, -70.242400
ID11: 08/1896; Long Island, NY: 40.951300, -72.127900
ID12: 22/07/1913; Long Island, NY: 40.563000, -73.679600
ID13: 9/08/1918; Long Island, NY: 40.945900, -72.106500
ID14: Summer 1919; Gulf of Maine: 43.759400, -69.701300
ID15: late 06/1926; Long Island, NY: 40.951300, -72.127900
ID18: 30-31/08/1754; Grand Banks of Newfoundland: 45.233100, -47.871700
ID19: 13/09/1765; Grand Banks of Newfoundland: 46.800900, -43.803000
ID20: 5/08/1763; Grand Banks of Newfoundland: 47.663600, -43.584400
ID21: 7/08/1763; Grand Banks of Newfoundland: 47.750900, -43.803000
ID22: 23/07/1754; Grand Banks of Newfoundland: 49.316700, -48.833300
ID23: 1850; Newfoundland: 47.570600, -56.149400
ID24: mid-August 1937; Placentia Bay: 47.108000, -54.309200
ID25: 09/1937; Newfoundland: 46.487400, -52.773000
ID26: Ca. 1595-1610; Red Bay, Labrador: 51.716700, -56.429100
ID27; 15/08/1587; Labrador Sea: 52.042800, -54.579000
ID28; 10/07/1806; Labrador Sea: 57.351200, -61.587100
ID29; 25-28/07/1768; Labrador Sea: 59.971700, -62.104300
ID30; 9/08/1768; Labrador Sea: 58.021700, -60.012600
ID31; 12-13/08/1768; Labrador Sea: 53.157900, -53.901700
ID32; 14/08/1768; Labrador Sea: 54.010300, -55.135300
ID33; 19-21/08/1768; Labrador Sea: 51.016700, -52.712500
ID34; summer 1887; Labrador Sea: 61.396900, -63.266300
ID35; 06/1858; Cape Farewell grounds: 60.050000, -35.000000
ID36; 1866; Cape Farewell grounds: 61.095900, -33.992900
ID37; 5/07/1868; Cape Farewell grounds: 60.000000, -34.000000
ID38; 5/06/1872; Cape Farewell grounds: 59.966670, -35.033000
ID39; 10/06/1872; Cape Farewell grounds: 59.900000, -33.780000
ID40; 12/06/1872; Cape Farewell grounds: 59.666700, -34.500000
ID41; 25-28/06/1866; Cape Farewell grounds: 59.650000, -39.550000
ID42; 4/07/1866; Cape Farewell grounds: 60.150000, -36.920000
ID43; 9/06/1866; Cape Farewell grounds: 60.617000, -34.080000
ID44; 17/06/1877; Cape Farewell grounds: 59.700000, -33.500000
ID45; 27/07/1878; Cape Farewell grounds: 59.833300, -33.555000
ID46; 11/06/1878; Cape Farewell grounds: 59.237900, -40.228500
ID47; 13-15/06/1878; Cape Farewell grounds: 56.100000, -42.700000
ID48; 30/07-3/8/1878; Cape Farewell grounds: 59.550000, -38.866700
ID49; 04-08/081878; Cape Farewell grounds: 59.600000, -40.150000
ID50; 07-08/1886; Cape Farewell grounds: 61.233300, -36.200000
ID51; 23/06/1891; Cape Farewell grounds: 59.920000, -35.420000
ID52; 13/07/1891; Cape Farewell grounds: 60.430000, -32.830000
ID53; 21-25/07/1891; Cape Farewell grounds: 61.000000, -34.000000
ID54; 22/07/1891; Cape Farewell grounds: 61.000000, -33.866700
ID55; 1610 – 1650; Iceland: 65.700400, -21.565900
ID56; 1613; Iceland: 65.662300, -21.523100
ID57; 1614-1615; Iceland: 65.959100, -21.489000
ID58; 1752; Iceland: 66.099500, -22.874600
ID59; 1770-1780; Iceland: 64.378500, -22.915100
ID60; 1802; Iceland: 65.886800, -19.447500
ID61; April to August, ca. 1873; Iceland: 65.091400, -12.733700
ID62; 2-25/07/1667; Finmark coast, Norway: 70.406700, 21.946900
ID63; pre-1884; Finmark coast, Norway: 70.307000, 31.110500
ID64; pre-1884; Finmark coast, Norway: 70.596100, 22.576900
ID65; 1935; Kola Peninsula: 69.559700, 33.697200
ID66; summer 1892; E of Iceland, around the Faroes: 62.299100, -7.376340
ID67; 07/07/1898; E of Iceland, around the Faroes: 61.454300, -8.040000
ID68; summer 1903; E of Iceland, around the Faroes: 62.418900, -6.058040
ID69; summer 1907; E of Iceland, around the Faroes: 61.810800, -6.477700
ID70; 14/08/1671; Shetlands: 60.387600, -1.777370
ID71; 1903 (presumably summer); Shetlands: 60.233400, -3.450020
ID72; summer 1905-1914; Shetlands: 61.471200, 0.806452
ID73; summer 1908-1914; Shetlands: 61.257200, 1.173050
ID74; summer 1908-1914; Shetlands: 61.439800, 1.248110
ID75; summer 1908-1914; Shetlands: 61.844300, -0.737626
ID76; summer 1908-1914; Shetlands: 60.243600, -3.306990
ID77; summer 1908-1914; Shetlands: 61.403400, -2.715160
ID78; summer 1908-1914; Shetlands: 61.355500, -3.326240
ID79; Summer 1905; Hebrides: 57.845300, -8.640090
ID80; Summer 1906; Hebrides: 57.997600, -8.369500
ID81; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 59.245800, -8.221920
ID82; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 58.280600, -8.783200
ID83; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 59.239000, -8.473930
ID84; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 58.298800, -8.594460
ID85; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 58.306800, -8.387100
ID86; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 58.144500, -8.860990
ID87; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 58.181700, -8.596290
ID88; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 58.170000, -8.353220
ID89; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.947200, -8.524920
ID90; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.948100, -8.655510
ID91; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.909500, -8.730970
ID92; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.890700, -8.862510
ID93; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.907600, -8.434230
ID94; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.760800, -8.363860
ID95; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.691100, -8.181370
ID96; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.643700, -8.330090
ID97; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.607000, -8.681280
ID98; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.489500, -8.592270
ID99; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.310500, -8.104330
ID100; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.243000, -8.179750
ID101; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.106300, -8.148600
ID102; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.235100, -8.434860
ID103; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.078600, -8.367110
ID104; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.813400, -9.069170
ID105; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.618100, -9.050290
ID106; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.393600, -9.072430
ID107; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.149300, -9.113040
ID108; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.784400, -9.313610
ID109; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.735500, -9.501610
ID110; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.656700, -9.745180
ID111; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.597100, -9.914800
ID112; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.628000, -9.481080
ID113; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.481400, -9.388220
ID114; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.325000, -9.333560
ID115; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.353700, -9.557610
ID116; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.381900, -9.801380
ID117; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.244900, -9.744980
ID118; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.207100, -9.465040
ID119; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.223200, -7.878340
ID120; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.702700, -7.585680
ID121; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.668500, -7.813670
ID122; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.909600, -8.262500
ID123; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.866200, -8.508540
ID124; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.811100, -8.755700
ID125; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.777500, -8.961040
ID126; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.752900, -9.290920
ID127; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.679500, -8.883900
ID128; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.567600, -8.686820
ID129; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.665800, -8.479410
ID130; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.741400, -8.212580
ID131; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.293800, -9.000330
ID132; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.426000, -8.632620
ID133; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.480700, -8.347770
ID134; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.414700, -8.070750
ID135; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.382700, -8.413140
ID136; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.251600, -8.600180
ID137; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.197100, -8.343410
ID138; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 56.295000, -8.138010
ID139; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides: 57.879000, -8.594370
ID140; 8-13/06/1908; Ireland: 54.407200, -10.527600
ID141; 'first fortnight of June' 1909; Ireland: 52.663100, -11.314300
ID142; summer 1910; Ireland: 53.989600, -10.876900
ID143; 2/07/1876; Commodore Morris Ground: 49.416700, -22.366700
ID144; 1618; Jan Mayen: 70.962100, -8.358410
ID145; 25/07/1850; Biscay: 43.791000, -2.642010

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ID1: 06/1699; Long Island, NY
In Reeves & Mitchell 1986a (Table 1): "12-13" whales caught, Long Island Whaling: East End.

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ID2: 08/1733; Bay of Fundy
In Starbuck, A. 1878 (p. 169): "A whale was taken in the Bay of Fundy by a Captain Hussey, and brought into Boston in August." According to Reeves et al. (1999), this was "probably a right whale".

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ID3: ca. 1/09/1838; Massachusetts Bay
In Allen, 1916 (p. 135): "A Right Whale, about 40 feet long, was found dead off Newburyport, Mass., about September 1st, and towed ashore at Salisbury Point. It was estimated that it would make about forty barrels of oil (Newburyport Herald). This is unusually early in the fall for this species to appear on our coasts."

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ID4: 31/07/1839; Long Island, NY
In Reeves & Mitchell 1986a (Table 1): 1 caught, "40 ft, 40 bbls".

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ID5: 1/06/1841; Long Island, NY
In Reeves & Mitchell 1986a (Table 1): "Whale seen in Gardiners Bay"

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ID6: 28/07/1841; Long Island, NY
In Reeves & Mitchell 1986a (Table 1): 2 killed

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ID7: ca. 1/06/1860; Block Island, NY
In Reeves & Mitchell 1986a (Table 1): 1, found floating

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ID8: 18/06/1866; Long Island, NY
In Reeves & Mitchell 1986a (Table 1): 1 seen

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ID9: 06/1872; Long Island, NY
In Reeves & Mitchell 1986a (Table 1): 2 killed

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ID10: ca. 1/06/1888; Cape Cod
In Allen, 1916 (p. 131): "Right Whale encountered off Cape Cod about the first of June, 1888, whose calf was first harpooned and killed, while the cow, refusing to leave her offspring, circled around and around until she succumbed after nine bomb-lances had been shot at her (Nantucket Journal, vol. 10, no. 36, June 7, 1888)." Also mentioned by Reeves et al. 1999.

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ID11: 08/1896; Long Island, NY
In Reeves & Mitchell 1986a (Table 1): 1 struck and lost.

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ID12: 22/07/1913; Long Island, NY
In Reeves & Mitchell 1986a (Table 1): "A large whale chased by several boats".

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ID13: 9/08/1918; Long Island, NY
In Reeves & Mitchell 1986a (Table 1): One taken, one struck and lost. "Young whale 'exceptionally fat' expected to produce 25-30 bbls. Only 30 gals of oil recovered, none sold". "Last whale landed by the Long Island shore whalers."

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ID14: Summer 1919; Gulf of Maine
In Reeves et al., 1999 (p. 7, citing Norton, 1930): "A right whale came ashore dead in Sheepscot Bay in summer 1919"

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ID15: late 06/1926; Long Island, NY
In Reeves & Mitchell 1986a (Table 1): "60 ft. female and 25 ft. calf sighted", "not chased"

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ID16: Summer 1583 ; Placentia Bay, Grand Bay
In Haie, 1889: a report of Gilbert’s 1583 trip to Newfoundland includes in the list of the commodities of the country “abundance of whales, for which also is a very great trade in the bays of Placentia and the Grand Bay, where is made train oils of the whale”. The trip was in the summer but it is not clear if he saw the "train oils" being made.

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ID17: 11/08/1760; Grand Banks of Newfoundland
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (Table 1; citing the logbook of the Enterprise, USA, whose main activity was Sperm whaling): "killed a right Whale & she sunk", "ca. 12-14 leagues [36-42 nmi] E of the Great Bank".

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ID18: 30-31/08/1754; Grand Banks of Newfoundland
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (Table 1; citing the logbook of the Phebe, USA, whose main activity was Sperm whaling): 30 August "saw a Noble Right Whale close" but escaped; 31 August "chased 3 but could not strike".

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ID19: 13/09/1765; Grand Banks of Newfoundland
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (Table 1; citing the logbook of the Diamond, USA, whose main activity was Sperm whaling): "saw two & chased, secured one".

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ID20: 5/08/1763; Grand Banks of Newfoundland
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (Table 1; citing the logbook of the Dolphin, USA, whose main activity was Sperm whaling): "saw one and chased but could not strike".

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ID21: 7/08/1763; Grand Banks of Newfoundland
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (Table 1; citing the logbook of the Dolphin, USA, whose main activity was Sperm whaling): "saw a Right Whale and chased but could not strike".

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ID22: 23/07/1754; Grand Banks of Newfoundland
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (Table 1; citing the logbook of the Phebe, USA, whose main activity was Sperm whaling): "saw several right whales", one struck and lost. Had seen "Icy Islands" on the 20 July. Position in map corresponds to coordinates for the 19/7/1754.

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ID23: 1850; Newfoundland
In Millais, 1907: "The last Right Whale killed in New-foundland was taken near Gaultois, on the south coast, in 1850." The author uses the term "right whale" to refer to bowheads too. No season is given, so presumed summer.

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ID24: mid-August 1937; Placentia Bay
In Mitchell et al., 1986: "A right whale killed in Placentia Bay in mid-August 1937 was the fist of its kind taken at the Rose-au-Rue whaling station during more than 19 years of operation". Photos included.

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ID25: 09/1937; Newfoundland
In Mead, 1986 (Appendix 2): "capture" "1,130cm female"; "The files of the Division of Mammals, USNM, have a photograph of a 37 ft (1,130) female rigth whale that was taken by the catcher boat Morelos 14 miles southeast of Cape Race, Newfoundland".

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ID26: Ca. 1595-1610; Red Bay, Labrador
McLeod et al., 2008: Genetic analyses of bones found in a marine excavation associated with a sunken galeon in Red Bay (Basque whaling). A single bone of right whale found (among many of bowheads).

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ID27; 15/08/1587; Labrador Sea
In Janes, 1906 (from the record of John Davis' third voyage): “The 17 we met a ship at sea, and as farre as we could judge it was a Biskaine: we thought she went a fishing for whales; for in 52 degrees or thereabout we saw very many.” The 15 of August they left the coast of Newfoundland/Labrador at about 52 degrees latitude (about the entrance to Belle Isle) and headed eastwards, so presumed that whales were seen east of Belle Isle. "

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ID28; 10/07/1806; Labrador Sea
In Reeves et al., 1983 (Table 1): 1 killed, young, 20 ft (est.). "Possibly a right whale (Eubalaena)?"

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ID29; 25-28/07/1768; Labrador Sea
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (Table 1; citing the logbook of the Reliance, USA, whose main activity was right [bowhead?] whaling): 25 July "Saw a Rite Whale bound to Nward, gave her chase 6 hours Could Not Strike Her" (24 July: 60.06°N); 26 July "Saw Rite Whales Very Plenty Could Not Strike them."; 28 July "Saw Whales plenty" at 60°N (29 July - 61°48'N, "Within 20 Leagues of Land"). Context: on the 27 May they had seen "some whales run" among thick ice (Bowheads?) but then no more whales were reported until the 25 of July. After that, whales frequently reported until the 20 August, between ca. 60° and 51°N off the coast of Labrador (Right Whales?), including the records above.

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ID30; 9/08/1768; Labrador Sea
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (Table 1; citing the logbook of the Reliance, USA, whose main activity was right [bowhead?] whaling): 9 August "Saw a Rite Whale gave her Chase Could Nots Strike her", "Saw Rite Whales [bowheads?] Plenty" (latitude 10 August 58°N). Context: on the 27 May they had seen "some whales run" among thick ice (Bowheads?) but then no more whales were reported until the 25 of July. After that, whales frequently reported until the 20 August, between ca. 60° and 51°N off the coast of Labrador (Right Whales?), including the records above.

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ID31; 12-13/08/1768; Labrador Sea
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (Table 1; citing the logbook of the Reliance, USA, whose main activity was right [bowhead?] whaling): 12 August "Lots Whalle"; spoke Capt Goodspeede who "told Us Whales Was plenty on the Coste" (53°18N); 13 August "Saw Whales [balaenids?] Struck one Lost her Lost one Iron", "Saw whales gave them Chase Could Not Strike". Context: on the 27 May they had seen "some whales run" among thick ice (Bowheads?) but then no more whales were reported until the 25 of July. After that, whales frequently reported until the 20 August, between ca. 60° and 51°N off the coast of Labrador (Right Whales?), including the records above.

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ID32; 14/08/1768; Labrador Sea
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (Table 1; citing the logbook of the Reliance, USA, whose main activity was right [bowhead?] whaling): 14 August "Saw whales plenty" (54°06N). Context: on the 27 May they had seen "some whales run" among thick ice (Bowheads?) but then no more whales were reported until the 25 of July. After that, whales frequently reported until the 20 August, between ca. 60° and 51°N off the coast of Labrador (Right Whales?), including the records above.

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ID33; 19-21/08/1768; Labrador Sea
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (Table 1; citing the logbook of the Reliance, USA, whose main activity was right [bowhead?] whaling): 19 August "Saw whales" (51°05N); 20 August "Kild one Whale [...] sunken" (51°16N); 21 August "Cutting the head", "Wents to trying"; 22 August "Rafts of blubber"; 23 August "Stowed away our oyl". Context: on the 27 May they had seen "some whales run" among thick ice (Bowheads?) but then no more whales were reported until the 25 of July. After that, whales frequently reported until the 20 August, between ca. 60° and 51°N off the coast of Labrador (Right Whales?), including the records above.

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ID34; summer 1887; Labrador Sea
In Clark, 1887 (p. 15): "They [right whales, Eubalaena] are taken during the summer months off the southern end of Greenland and to a limited extent in the lower part of Davis Strait, near Resolution Island". Clark distinguished right whales from bowheads (whose distribution is described separately) but given the high latitude of this record it is nonetheless assumed to be taxonomically uncertain.

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ID35; 06/1858; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (p. 225; citing a letter from Captain C. Chapel, of the Violet, to Cpt. Wiliam Jackson, 16 Oct 1859): "found these whales [the proper Black whale] first on 11 June at 60°30'N, 35° W", "coming from the Eastwards, where they must have been some time in April & May" and then followed them "bound west a little southerly true course down off Cape Farewell". Two were taken at 61°30'N, 34-36° W in June.

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ID36; 1866; Cape Farewell grounds
Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (p. 226, citing a note in the abstract of the schooner Petrel, USA): a "Right whale ground" was noted at Lat 60.00 N to 62.00N, Long. 33.00W to 35.00W.

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ID37; 5/07/1868; Cape Farewell grounds
In Schevill & Moore, 1983 (Table 1 and Fig 1) and Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (both citing the loogbook of the whaler Ansel Gibbs, USA): 1 saved, 1 struck and lost; cow and calf killed 5 July [1868]; cow sunk, calf produced 26bbls.

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ID38; 5/06/1872; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves et al., 2007 (Table 2.2; citing the loogbook of the whaler Ansel Gibbs, USA): Some right whales seen.

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ID39; 10/06/1872; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves et al., 2007 (Table 2.2; citing the loogbook of the whaler Ansel Gibbs, USA): 1 killed.

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ID40; 12/06/1872; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves et al., 2007 (Table 2.2; citing the loogbook of the whaler Ansel Gibbs, USA): Some right whales seen.

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ID41; 25-28/06/1866; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves et al., 2007 (Table 2.2; citing the loogbook of the whaler Pacific, USA): 25/6: two whales seen; 26/6: two whales chased; 27/6: one killed and sank; 28/6: one killed. The coordinates were taken on the 25/6.

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ID42; 4/07/1866; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves et al., 2007 (Table 2.2; citing the loogbook of the whaler Pacific, USA): 1 killed and sank.

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ID43; 9/06/1866; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves et al., 2007 (Table 2.2; citing the loogbook of the whaler Pacific, USA): 1 killed.

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ID44; 17/06/1877; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves et al., 2007 (p. 39, citing the logbooks of the Daniel Webster, New Bedford): Right whale cow & calf; calf killed and tried (estimated 20 bbls), cow struck and lost (estimated 100 bbl). Also in Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (Table 2), and likely correspond to the 2 individuals of June 1878 in Schevill & Moore (1983).

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ID45; 27/07/1878; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves et al., 2007 (Table 2.2; citing the loogbook of the whaler Adeline Gibbs, USA): Some right whales seen.

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ID46; 11/06/1878; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (citing the logbook of the shooner Abbie, Bradford): Encountered right whales 11 June 1878, one captured. "Although only one whale was captured, Ferguson believed the vessel was 'into the middle of quite a school of whales, for they could be heard spouting in different directions all around us any time during the night".

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ID47; 13-15/06/1878; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (p. 226; citing the abstract of the A.J. Ross, refering to sightings by the Shooner Astoria): whales seen, Reeves & Michell assume they are right whales.

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ID48; 30/07-3/8/1878; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (citing the logbook of the Shooner Astoria): whales seen; Reeves & Michell assume they are right whales.

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ID49; 04-08/081878; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (citing the logbook of the Shooner Astoria): whales seen; Reeves & Michell assume they are right whales.

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ID50; 07-08/1886; Cape Farewell grounds
In Schevill & Moore, 1983 (Table 1) and in Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (p. 227; citing the logbook of the whaler Palmetto, USA): "sailed 24 June for 'Hudson bay' [...]. By 17 July, however, the Palmetto was at 61°14'N, 36°12'W, i.e. on the Cape Farewell Ground. Right whales were first sighted 20 July, and by 9 August the crew had taken their fifth whale alongside". 15+ whales (5 saved, 2 struck and 8+ sighted).

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ID51; 23/06/1891; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves et al., 2007 (Table 2.2; citing the loogbook of the whaler Petrel, USA): 1 right whale seen.

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ID52; 13/07/1891; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves et al., 2007 (Table 2.2; citing the loogbook of the whaler Petrel, USA): 1 seen.

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ID53; 21-25/07/1891; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves et al., 2007 (Table 2.2; citing the loogbook of the whaler Petrel, USA): 21/07, 1 seen; 22/07, 1 chased; 23/07, 3 seen, 1 killed (sank); 24/97, 2 seen; 25/07, 1 killed. Location is for 23/07.

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ID54; 22/07/1891; Cape Farewell grounds
In Reeves et al., 2007 (Table 2.2; citing the loogbook of the whaler Petrel, that reported a catch by the Mermaid, USA): 1 killed.

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ID55; 1610 – 1650; Iceland
In Edvardsson & Rafnsson, 2006: "Archaeological escavations at Strákatangi strongly suggest that the site is a foreign whaling station from the 17th century, with many similarities with whaling stations from the 17th century in the North Atlantic region, especially Red Bay in Labrador. It is impossible to say from the archaeological material which nationality occupied the station but local tales suggest that the whalers at Strákatanga were Basques that came from the Basque regions in North Spain and South France. [...] These remains suggest that foreign whalers built stations on land and used them during the whaling season. The artifacts give us a relative date for the occupation of the site, which indicate a occupation in the period 1610 – 1650. No animal bones were recovered during the excavation and sieving of cultural deposits with a 5 mm sieve did neither produce animal nor fish bones." However, Magnús Rafnsson (personal comm, 18/11/2013): "A couple of skulls were found around the ruins and DNA research said they were from right whales."

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ID56; 1613; Iceland
Edvardsson & Rafnsson, 2006 (citing Jón Guðmundsson): "The first whaling ship arrived in Strandir in 1613, causing fear among the inhabitants who were not used to seeing ocean-going vessels. The local pastor arrived on the scene and pointed the Spaniards to a suitable harbor in Steingrímsfjörður, near his abode, all with the consent of the sheriff, Ari Magnússon. The Basques caught 17 whales."

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ID57; 1614-1615; Iceland
Edvardsson & Rafnsson, 2006 (citing Jón Guðmundsson): "According to Jón Guðmundsson, four ships were whaling in Reykjarfjörður [in 1614]close to where he lived."; "That same summer [1615] Jón tells of sixteen ships by Strandir, most of which sailed east to Russia but four ships spent the summer whaling from Reykjafjörður in Strandir."

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ID58; 1752; Iceland
Lindquist, 1994 (p. 201; citing J. Eiriksson 1768): "J. Eiriksson (1768: 253f) mentions French "sléttbakur" whaling in Ísafjarðardjup in 1752; furthermore: 'it is also probable that his whale fish breeds inside the fiords of Ísafjarðarsysla and Barðastandasysla, and … raises there its young during the summer, in … May, June and July, and leaves them late in the month of August, when then some of these abandoned ones occasionally fall prey to the inhabitants.' Eiriksson could be referring to the, mainly, humpback calf whaling in Arnarfjörður."

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ID59; 1770-1780; Iceland
Eschricht & Reinhardt, 1866 (citing Pontoppidan 1785): "even American vessels, as late as between 1770 and 1780, occasionally caught Nordkapers in Brede Fiord and Faxe Bay, in Iceland."

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ID60; 1802; Iceland
Lindquist, 1994 (p. 849): "Another good slettboku-hvlalur (i.e. black right whale) came ashore at Naust near Hofson"

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ID61; April to August, ca. 1873; Iceland
Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (citing a cryptic anotation in an anonymous compilation of American whaling abstracts, not dated but in the same page with memoranda concerning cruises in 1867 and in 1872-73): "Iceland Grounds. Right Whales. April to August Lat 63 to 67 Long 11 to 16 W."

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ID62; 2-25/07/1667; Finmark coast, Norway
In Smith et al., 2006 and Reeves & Smith, 2006 (citing Barthelmess, 2003, whose original source was a journal kept by Christian Bullen, coxswain aboard an unidentified Hamburg whaleship): A Hamburg vessel left the Svalbard (Spitzbergen) bowhead whaling ground durimg midsummer to hunt right whales off northern Norway between 2-25 July, in "bay whaling" centred in Lopphavet, the Loppa Sea. Of the Finnmark coast in July, this ship encountered "many" right whales, as well as Dutch, French, Flemish and German whaleships (about 20 of which used the Loppa Sea as a roadstead).

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ID63; pre-1884; Finmark coast, Norway
In Guldberg, 1884: Bones identified as the N Atlantic Right Whale, presumed to corresponded to Dutch whaling in the previous centuries.

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ID64; pre-1884; Finmark coast, Norway
In Guldberg, 1884: Bones identified as the N Atlantic Right Whale + old try pots (in an area called the Dutchman Hill), presumed to correspond to Dutch whaling in the previous centuries.

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ID65; 1935; Kola Peninsula
Tomilin, 1967 (p. 55): "A Biscayan whale was last observed at the coasts of the Kola Peninsula in summer 1935; it was found dead in the surface of the sea and towed to Murmansk (local newspapers erroneously described it as "Greenland whale")"

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ID66; summer 1892; E of Iceland, around the Faroes
In Collett, 1909: "One specimen captured off the Faroe Islands"; by Norwegian whalers.

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ID67; 07/07/1898; E of Iceland, around the Faroes
Collet (1909) refers to "One specimen taken near the Faroe Islands (a female accompanied by a young one)"; by Norwegian whalers, in the summer. Possibly the same 2 individuals in the IWC database (IWC, 2013) taken on the 7th July 189 by Norwegian whalers (station/factory: Strømnæs, Faroe).

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ID68; summer 1903; E of Iceland, around the Faroes
Collet (1909) refers to "One specimen taken off the Faroe Islands"; by Norwegian whalers. Possibly the same individual mentioned in t IWC database (IWC, 2013) as taken in the Faroe Islands by Norway (station/factory: Lopra. A/S Suderø) in 1903.

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ID69; summer 1907; E of Iceland, around the Faroes
In Collett, 1909: "Two specimens were also taken off the Faroe Islands"; by Norwegian whalers.

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ID70; 14/08/1671; Shetlands
In White, 1855 (p. 115, citing Friderich Martens' report of a 1671 whaling voyage): "In our home-voyage to Hamburg I saw an example of this enmity of a North-caper whale and a sword-fish, near to Hitland ; they fought and struck at one another so vehemently that the water flew about like dust, sometimes one, sometimes the other was uppermost".

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ID71; 1903 (presumably summer); Shetlands
In Haldane, 1907 (p. 13): "The only other specimen I have heard of was got in 1903 by a Faroe whaler 50 miles off Shetland"

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ID72; summer 1905-1914; Shetlands
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 7 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Shettlands between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of the 66 taken in the Hebrides + Shetlands: 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August.

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ID73; summer 1908-1914; Shetlands
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 7 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Shettlands between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of the 66 taken in the Hebrides + Shetlands: 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August.

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ID74; summer 1908-1914; Shetlands
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 7 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Shettlands between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of the 66 taken in the Hebrides + Shetlands: 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August.

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ID75; summer 1908-1914; Shetlands
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 7 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Shettlands between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of the 66 taken in the Hebrides + Shetlands: 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August.

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ID76; summer 1908-1914; Shetlands
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 7 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Shettlands between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of the 66 taken in the Hebrides + Shetlands: 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August.

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ID77; summer 1908-1914; Shetlands
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 7 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Shettlands between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of the 66 taken in the Hebrides + Shetlands: 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August.

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ID78; summer 1908-1914; Shetlands
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 7 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Shettlands between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of the 66 taken in the Hebrides + Shetlands: 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August.

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ID79; Summer 1905; Hebrides
In Collett, 1909: "One was wounded off St. Kilda, but escaped"

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ID80; Summer 1906; Hebrides
In Collett, 1909: "six killed, and more seen [...] off the Hebrides, between the 13th June and the 4th August", by Norwegian whalers.

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ID81; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID82; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID83; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID84; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID85; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID86; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID87; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID88; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID89; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID90; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID91; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID92; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID93; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID94; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID95; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID96; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID97; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID98; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID99; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID100; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID101; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID102; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID103; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID104; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID105; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID106; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID107; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID108; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID109; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID110; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID111; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID112; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID113; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID114; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID115; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID116; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID117; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID118; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID119; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID120; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID121; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID122; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID123; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID124; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID125; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID126; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID127; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID128; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID129; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID130; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID131; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID132; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID133; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID134; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID135; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID136; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID137; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID138; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID139; Summer 1905-1914; Hebrides
In Thompson, 1918 (one of 59 points in his Fig. 1, for whales taken off the Hebrides between 1908 and 1914, by Norwegian whalers). Out of 66 (Hebrides + Shetlands): 3 were taken in May; 43 in June; 19 in July; 1 in August. Collett 1909 also noted that "the schools [in 1908] consisted of several hundred", and "the plankton-bearing currents probably flowed nearer land than in 1907, for the whales might be met with quite in the shallow water between islands and rocks. Their stay this year was of only three week's duration". Also mentioned by Reid et al. 2003 and IWC 2013.

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ID140; 8-13/06/1908; Ireland
In Collett 1909: "Five specimens […] captured off Inishkea, Ireland, between June 8th and June 13th (among them one female and a young one)"; "They were all separate, and no schools were observed" According to Lilie 1910, these were taken by the Arranmore Whaling Company, on the island of S. Inishkea; under Norwegian management. The same record (5 individuals, in "Ireland N", by the UK, station/factory: Iniskea Is, Arranmore Whal. Co) is in the IWC database (2013).

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ID141; 'first fortnight of June' 1909; Ireland
According to Lillie 1910: five were taken by the Arranmore Whaling Company (shore whaling, Norwegian management); "within a radius of 70 miles north, south and west of Innishkea". The same record (5 individuals, in "Ireland N", by the UK, station/factory: Iniskea Is, Arranmore Whal. Co) is in the IWC database (2013).

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ID142; summer 1910; Ireland
According to Lillie 1910: 9 were taken, including five by the Arranmore Whaling Company (S. Inishkea island), four by the Blacksod Whaling company (Mullet peninsula St Mayo), shore whaling companies run by Norvegians. This is likely to include the 4+4 individuals, in "Ireland N", taken by the UK (4 by station/factory Iniskea Is, Arranmore WhCo and 4 by station/factory Ardelly Pt, Belmullet. BlacksodWhC) in the IWC database (2013).

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ID143; 2/07/1876; Commodore Morris Ground
Reeves & Mitchell, 1986b (p. 231, citing a journal kept by the wife of the captain of the whaler Ohio, USA): "boats where lowered, without success, for 'a Right Whale' at 49°25'N 22°22'W, squarely on the Commodore Morris Ground".

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ID144; 1618; Jan Mayen
According to Lubbock, 1978 (p. 71): “whales both Greenland and right, were very plentiful round Jan Mayen when [King] James granted the fishing to Hull [i.e., 1618]”, however he provides no references or further information to support this statement .

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ID145; 25/07/1850; Biscay
In Markham & Flower, 1881 (p. 975): "It was at one time supposed that the Balaena biscayensis had become quite extinct; but this is certainly not the case. Whales are seen on the Cantabrian coast at intervals of about ten years. [...] On the 25th of July 1850, early in the morning, a whale appeared off Guetaria. Boats quickly pursued it; but the harpooner missed his aim, and the whale went off, heading N.W." The record is clearly described as Righ Whale, but assumed of low certainty given the unusual season.

You can download these points as a KML file by clicking on the Google Maps icon in the upper right corner of the map. If using these records in bulk please cite Monsarrat et al. (2015).

These records were obtained from a review of the literature for confirmed or likely records of North Atlantic right whales, and correspond to Table S2 and Figure S3 in Monsarrat et al. (2015). They are highly biased towards more recent (better documented) observations, despite the fact that the species became progressively scarcer in the past centuries. The early 20th Century records testify the final captures  records of a species that was nearly extinct. There is also a strong spatial bias towards coastal regions, where whales were more accessible and where records can be more easily mapped.

Records coded as having an uncertain location are those that could not be mapped with reasonable certainty to a 1° cell. These include, for example, general locations referring to a landmark (e.g. ID66), records at sea where only general coordinates were given (e.g. ID36), and records where precise coordinates existed but for a different date (e.g. ID22). Records for which the species is uncertain are mainly those that could plausibly correspond to bowhead whales (e.g. ID29) given that the two species were often not clearly differentiated in the historical records.

For more information, see Monsarrat et al. (2015).

References

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Allen, J.A. (1908). The North Atlantic right whale and its near allies. Bulletin of the AMNH ; v. 24, article 18. Bull. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., XXIV, 277–329 (+plates).

Barthelmess, K. (2003). Das erste gedruckte deutsche Walfangjournal: Christian Bullens “Tag=Register” einer Hamburger Fangreise nach Spitzbergen und Nordnorwegen im Jahre 1667. De Bataafsche Leeuw, Amsterdam; Bremerhaven.

Clark, A.H. (1887). Part XV - The whale fishery. 1 - History and present conditions of the fishery. In: Fish. Fish. Ind. U. S. (ed. Goode, G.B.). United States Bureau of Fisheries, Government Printing Office, Washington, pp. 3–218.

Collett, R. (1909). A few notes on the whale Balaena glacialis and its capture in recent years in the North Atlantic by Norwegian whalers. Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond., 7, 91–97.

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Haldane, R.C. (1907). Whaling in Scotland. Ann. Scott. Nat. Hist., 61, 10–15.

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Janes, J. (1906). The third voyage Northwestward, made by M. John Davis Gentleman, as chiefe captaine & Pilot generall, for the discovery of a passage to the Isles of the Moluccas, or the coast of China , in the yeere 1587. Written by M. John Janes. In: Princ. Navig. Voyag. Traffiques Discov. Engl. Nation Made Sea Overl. Remote Farthest Distant Quart. Earth Any Time Compasse These 1600 Yeares (ed. Hakluyt, R.). James MacLehose and Sons, Glasgow, pp. 414–422.

Lillie, D.G. (1910). Observations on the anatomy and general biology of some members of the larger Cetacea. Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond., 1910, 769–792.

Lindquist, O. (1994). Whales, dolphins and porpoises in the economy and culture of peasant fishermen in Norway, Orkney, Shetland, Faeroe Islands and Iceland, ca. 900-1900 AD, and Norse Greenland, ca 1000-1500 AD.

Lubbock, B. (1978). The Arctic Whaler. Brown, Son & Ferguson Ltd, Glasgow.

Markham, C.R. & Flower. (1881). On the whale-fishery of the basque provinces of Spain. Proc. Zool. Soc. Lond., 1881, 969–976.

McLeod, B.A., Brown, M.W., Moore, M.J., Stevens, W., Barkham, S.H. & White, B.N. (2008). Bowhead whales, and not right whales, were the primary target of 16th- to 17th-century Basque whalers in the western North Atlantic. Arctic, 61, 61–75.

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Mitchell, E., Kozicki, V.M. & Reeves, R.R. (1986). Sightings of right whales, Eubalaena glacialis, on the Scotian Shelf, 1966-1972. Rep. Int. Whal. Comm., Special Issue 10, 83–107.

Monsarrat, S., Pennino, M.G., Smith, T.D., Reeves, R.R., Meynard, C.N., Kaplan, D.M. & Rodrigues, A.S.L. (2015). Historical summer distribution of the endangered North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis): a hypothesis based on environmental preferences of a congeneric species. Divers. Distrib., 21, 925–937.

Norton, A.H. (1930). The mammals of Portland, Maine, and vicinity. Portland Society of Natural History (Me.). Portland Society of Natural History, Portland, Me.

Reeves, R.R., Breiwick, J.M. & Mitchell, E.D. (1999). History of whaling and estimated kill of right whales, Balaena glacialis, in the Northeastern United States, 1620–1924. Mar. Fish. Rev., 61, 1–36.

Reeves, R.R. & Mitchell, E. (1986a). American pelagic whaling for right whales in the North Atlantic. Rep. Int. Whal. Comm., Special Issue 10, 221–254.

Reeves, R.R. & Mitchell, E. (1986b). The Long Island, New York, right whale fishery: 1650-1924. Rep. Int. Whal. Comm., Special Issue 10, 201–220.

Reeves, R.R., Mitchell, E.D., Mansfield, A. & McLaughlin, M. (1983). Distribution and migration of the bowhead whale, Balaena mysticetus,in the Eastern North American Arctic. Arctic, 36, 5–64.

Reeves, R.R. & Smith, T.D. (2006). A taxonomy of world whaling. In: Whales Whal. Ocean Ecosyst. (eds. Estes, J.A., DeMaster, D.P. & Doak, D.F.). California University Press, Berkeley CA, USA, pp. 82–101.

Reeves, R.R., Smith, T.M. & Josephson, E.A. (2007). Near-annihilation of a species: right whaling in the North Atlantic. In: Urban Whale N. Atl. Right Whales Crossroads (eds. Kraus, S.D. & Rolland, R.M.). Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, pp. 39–74.

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